Category Archives: Veterinary

Dog Training – What Works, And What Doesn’t

Published by:

Many dog training methods are based on what makes the OWNER feel good, rather than on what actually makes sense to the DOG. For example….

“Positive only” dog training has become popular nowadays.
With “positive only” dog training, you bribe your dog to do something with food or a toy. If he does the desired behavior, he receives the reward.

Dog Training 2
“Positive only” dog training often includes a clicker device – a little metal tab that makes a clicking sound when pressed with your thumb. Clicker training is a form of “conditioning.” You click at the precise instant your dog is doing some desired behavior, then immediately give a treat. The dog learns that whenever he hears the clicking sound, whatever behavior he was doing at that instant will bring him food.

The problem with “positive only” dog training


Positive-only dog training and clicker training work well for teaching fun things – like tricks – where it really doesn’t matter whether your dog obeys or not. If you tell him to shake hands or roll over and he doesn’t do it, who cares?
But for teaching your dog to come when called in the presence of temptations or distractions…. for teaching your dog to stand quietly while his teeth are brushed or his coat is groomed…. for teaching your dog to act politely toward strangers and other animals….

….and for teaching your dog all the other behaviors you want a well-behaved family dog to do (or not do!)…. positive-only dog training is less effective.

Think about it. What happens when you want your dog to stop chasing a cat and come to you – but at that particular moment he’s not hungry and would rather chase the cat rather than munch on a biscuit?

Dog Training

Owners who rely on positive-only dog training are stuck whenever their dog “isn’t in the mood” to do something.

An old trainer once said that if a dog really wants to chase a cat, he will chase it “regardless of biscuits showering upon him like manna from heaven.”…. continue reading  on http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com

Dog health , training and presents for dog owners !

Published by:

Dogs are prone to ear infections because of the anatomy of their ears. They have a horizontal and a vertical component to them, so it is hard for anything in to drain out.


dog-health

Signs of an ear infection include excessive head shaking, yellow to brown oozing in the ears, or a yeast-like smell. Additional signs of ear infections include redness and swelling.

moderndoggroup.com how to become a dog trainer

There are several causes of ear infections. The most common cause of ear infections are due to allergies. Some dogs are more prone to allergies than others; therefore they get more ear infections.

If your dog does have an ear infection it is important to properly clean your dog’s ears before applying any medication.

To clean your dog’s ears, start by placing a few drops of an ear cleanser into the ear and massage the ear to help loosen any debris that is in there. Then use a cloth or cotton gauze to wipe the dirt out.

gifts for german shepherd lovers

After your dog’s ears are thoroughly clean, you can then apply your medication. Follow your veterinarian’s advice about how much medication to apply to the ear, usually a few drops.

The treatment your veterinarian will prescribe will vary depending on the cause of the ear infection. For yeast infections, they might prescribe anti-fungal medication. For bacterial infections they will probably prescribe antibiotics. Normally, treatment is applied directly into the ears, but in severe cases systemic treatment may be needed. This usually means having to give your dog pills orally. .

Some breeds of dogs that are prone to ear infections include breeds with large ears that flap over the ear canal, and breeds of dogs that have a very small canal. These dogs need their ears checked often.

By knowing what to look for, you can detect ear infections early.

dog sitters directory